Caitlin Fairchild | Nextgov | July 5, 2017 | 0 Comments

How to Solve Common iPhone Battery Woes

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Battery problems are common complaints among smartphone users, and companies like Apple are always looking to improve battery life with each new phone they release.

After owning an iPhone for a while, many people might notice the battery dies quicker. While it might seem inevitable, there are a few things you can do to halt this.

Start your investigation on the battery settings page to see exactly which apps have used the most power for the past week. Click on a small clock icon to the right, and you can see more detailed data about your phone's battery breakdown.

If they're expendable, delete the apps hogging your battery. For the essential apps, make them more energy efficient by turning off background updating. To do that, go to Settings, then General, then to Background App Refresh, and from there you can pick and choose which apps need to run in the background.

Apps that use background location tracking is another easy to fix battery hog. To stop this function from eating up your battery every day, go to Settings, then Privacy, then to Locations Services and from there change the settings for each app accordingly. Perhaps you still want to let Google Maps track your location in the background but Grubhub will no longer get that privilege.

Another common battery woe is that iPhones sometimes heat up to uncomfortable temperatures while charging. Using a cheap, off brand chargers can cause this, and the solution is to simply replace your charger. Apple recommends only using certified third-party accessories with your iPhone.

If your phone keeps shutting off randomly and suddenly, this could be a more serious battery problem. Potential solutions are to install any software updates, restore your iPhone from a recent backup and if there's no backup available, perform a factory reset. If all else fails, take your device to an expert.

To learn more, check out the video below from CNET:

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