Heather Kuldell | Nextgov | January 29, 2017 | 0 Comments

Lawmaker Still Wants Feds to Stop Watching Porn at Work, Plus Other Bills to Watch

Keith Lamond/Shutterstock.com

Will the third time be the charm for Rep. Mark Meadows’ bill to remove access to pornography from agencies?

The North Carolina representative introduced the Eliminating Pornography from Agencies Act in the 113th and 114th sessions in response to an Environmental Protection Agency employee who reportedly watched two to six hours of it a day at work.

One Cybersecurity Committee to Rule Them All

Sens. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., and Chris Coons, D-Del., introduced legislation to establish a mega-cyber committee with 21 members, including the chairs and ranking members of the dozens standing committees that already oversee cyber issues.

The proposed Senate Select Committee on Cybersecurity’s jurisdiction would include domestic and international cyber risks to U.S. computer systems, citizens, infrastructure, businesses and commerce.

“Cybersecurity policy is one of the most complex and significant challenges facing Congress, yet the Senate’s structure to investigate and address cyber issues is diffuse and inadequate," Gardner said in a statement. "This has led to an uncoordinated policy response to recent cyber attacks on government agencies, businesses and infrastructure.”

What Does Your Car Know About You?

So if a car can be hacked remotely and made to stop, what are the other risks involved? Legislation from Reps. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., and Ted Lieu, D-Calif., want the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to dive into the best cybersecurity practices for connected cars.

The Security and Privacy in Your Car Study Act of 2017, or SPY Car Study Act, orders a report from agencies including the Federal Trade Commission, the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Defense Department, and private industry to determine how to protect critical systems, detect and mitigate malicious code, and secure the data the vehicles collect.

Internet Access Bill Advances

The Digital Global Access Policy Act, or Digital GAP Act, passed the House on Tuesday. The bill supports expanding internet access and infrastructure in developing countries, specifically encouraging affordability and “gender-equitable” access.

Confirmation Count

The Senate last week confirmed Sen. Mike Pompeo as director of the CIA and South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Committees will revisit the nominations of Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., for attorney general, Betsy DeVos for secretary of education on Tuesday and Linda McMahon for Small Business Administration leader this week.

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